Components

Arcane Spellcasters use three types of components in spellcasting; Verbal, Somatic and Material. The Player's Handbook provides a listing of components for each spell. These are just examples, though. In the World of Naeja, there are specific verbal, material and somatic components spell casters may choose from for the casting of their spells.

MATERIAL COMPONENTS

Gem Stones as Components

Gem Stones Rarity Descriptor Spell Levels Arcana Threshold
Agate
Amethyst
Angel Wing Agate
Angelite
Apophyllite
Aragonite
Aventurine
Black Obsidian
Black Tourmaline
Blue Dumortierite
Blue Lace Agate
Blue Tigers Eye (Hawks Eye)
Calcite
Carnelian
Cats Eye
Celestite
Chalcedony
Chalcopyrite
Chiastolite Cross
Chlorite
Citrine
Coral
Diamond
Dolomite
Emerald
Fluorite
Galena
Garnet
Hematite
Howlite
Hyalite Opal
Indicolite
Labradorite
Lapis
Malachite
Peacock Ore (Bornite)
Pearl
Peridot
Petrified Wood
Picasso Stone
Pyrite
Obsidian
Red Jasper
Red Tigers Eye
Rose Quartz
Ruby
Sapphire
Tiger Iron
Yellow Aventurine

Rare Woods

Wood Rarity Descriptor Spell Levels Arcana Threshold

Precious Metals

Metal Rarity Descriptor Spell Levels Arcana Threshold
Copper
Iron
Bronze
Steele
Silver
Gold
Platinum
Mithril
Adamantine

Monstrous Components

Component Rarity Descriptor Spell Levels Arcana Threshold
Griffon Hair
Dragon Scale

VERBAL COMPONENTS

Often the match that sparks the flame is the invocation of an arcane word. Words have power, laid down in ages past by the creator of the universe. There are many Words of Power that describe magic, and there are many different ways to learn to invoke them.
The following are common Words of Power. Your DM may create other Words of Power, or even allow you to create your own.
To invoke a spell, you utter a sentence using these Words of Power. Each “Invocation” is actually an incomplete sentence because it is assumed to begin with “E Apolysi se/eis/epi” (“I discharge at/to/on…”). Therefore, the first word in the sentence is the object of the prepositional phrase. The effect of the spell is actually the ??? of the preposition. So, you might utter a phrase such as “you a burst of fire” using the actual Words of Power, so the assumed sentence would be, “I cast at you a burst of fire.”

Object: The Object of the phrase invokes the target of the spell, or the point of origin for an area of effect.
Adjective: If an area of effect is indicated there will be an adjective before the Root Word to indicate the shape of the area (before or after Descriptor).
Descriptor: The Descriptor is used to invoke the “Descriptor” of a spell, as defined in the Player’s Handbook. Not all spells have a descriptor.
Root Word: The Root Word is used to invoke the “School of Magic” of a spell, as defined in the Player’s Handbook. If a spell comes from a subschool, there is a compound word.
Suffix: The Suffix of the Secondary Root Word invokes the power level of the spell. Some spells have various levels of power, and the suffix describes the differences in those. Ie: Monster Summoning I, Monster Summoning II,
Conjunctions: Conjunctions combine Primary, Secondary, Compound Words, and Meta Words to form complex structures to describe complex spells.
Meta Words: Meta Words invoke meta-magic feats. You add them to the end of the phrase as an adjective describing the entire spell.
Adjectives: There are also some adjectives that help invoke a spell when there is more than one way to cast that spell. Ie:

Table 5-01 Arcane Verbal Components

Target Term Object
You (me, myself) E idios
Creature (you) Eso esy
Creature (them) Esu eseis
Object (that) Ekeino ekeinos
Object (those) Ekeinu ekeines
Point of Origin (here) Edo edo
Point of Origin (there) Edei ekei
Area of Effect Adjective
Burst ekrios ekrixi
Emanation pigazo
Spread xaplonos xaplono
Cone konos konos
Cylinder kylindros kylindros
Line seiros seira
Sphere sfairos sfaira
plane (wall, floor) epipedos epipedos
Descriptor Greek Root
Acid axos oxys
Chaotic kaos kaos
Cold cryos cryos/pagos
Darkness thanatos
Electricity lektros ilektrikos
Evil kakos kakos
Fear fobos fobos
Fire kaios anabo/kaio/pyro
Force kinitkos bias/dynami/kinitikos
Good agathos agathos
Language-Dependent profos proforikos
Lawful nomimos nomimos
Light fosos fos
Mind-affecting nousos nous/paraisthisiogonos
sonic ecos ichitikos
teleportation portos metakinitikos
School/Subschool Secondary Root Word Greek Root
Abjuration apokira apokirysso
Conjuration endorkizo- exorkizo
Calling apaita apaito
Creation dimirga dimiourgo
Healing therapeva therapevo
Summoning kilteva klitevo
Divination mantosyna mantosyni
Enchantment mageio- mageia
Charm goitea goiteia
Compulsion exanagkasma exanagkasmos
Evocation anapola anapolo
Illusion apato- apati
Figment fantaza plasma tis fantasias
Glammer gylistra gyalisteros
Pattern protypa protypo
Phantasm imkatoptrisma antikatoptrismos
Shadow skiaza skiazo
Necromancy nekromenta nekromanteia
Transmutation metatropa metatropi
Universal pagkosma pagkosmios
Conjunction
and ai kai
also epi episis
or ete I, eite
not ano an-, ochi
Metamagic Meta Word
Empower spell exousiodoto
Enlarge spell megelono
Extend spell ekteino
Heighten spell enteino
Maximize spell megisteino
Quicken spell tachyno
Silence spell siopio
Still spell akinitos
Widen spell dievryno

Examples:
Using the above structure, here are the verbal components for some common spells:

Burning Hands:
“I cast at there a burst of fire-evocation.”
“… Edei Ekrios Kaios-Anapola.”

Bull’s Strength:
“I cast on you a transmutation”
“… Epo Metatropa.”
Note that Bull Strength also requires a material and somatic component, so it is not entirely dependent on a verbal component, so this simple phrase is fine.

Magic Missile:
“I cast at them force-evocation.”
“…Esu Kinitkos-Anapola.”

Summon Monster III – Small Fire elemental
“I cast here a summoning-conjuration-fire-level 3”
“…Edo Exorkizo-Kilteva Kaios ???”

As you can tell, the phrases don’t perfectly describe the spell. It takes more than just verbal components to cast a spell. Remember, Verbal Components are part of a trigger for a spell that you have usually


SOMATIC COMPONENTS

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