Player Points

Player Points Roster

Benefit Cost Short Description Special Notes
Attribute reroll 1 Reroll 1 attribute once reroll one attribute once, take better of the two rolls
2nd Attribute reroll 2 Reroll 1 attribute once reroll another attribute once, take better of two rolls (this can't be same attribute rerolled using "Attribute reroll).
Reroll 1 Reroll 1 dice roll Maximum 3 rolls (2 rerolls), take best of rolls.
Hitdie reroll 1 Reroll hitdie roll Take best of rolls, must accept if at least 2 points better than first roll.
Take 10 after the fact 1 Take 10 after rolling The character can roll first and then if taking 10 would be better, do so.
Take 20 after the fact 2 Take 20 after rolling The character can roll first and then if taking 20 would be better, do so.
Improved take 10 1 Take 10 on any roll Allowed for rolls that don't normally allow take 10
Improved take 20 2 Take 20 on any in game Decide before rolling, allowed for rolls that don't normally allow take 20
Luck bonus 1 +4 Luck bonus for 1 round For the duration of one round the character is granted a +4 luck bonus to all rolls/checks
Lucky Day 1 +1 Luck bonus for 1 day For the duration of one day the character is granted a +1 luck bonus to all rolls/checks
Auto success 4 1 roll/check auto succeeds The character may succeed at one roll check automatically, and may still roll for the chance of a critical.
Lucky Night 2 +1 Luck bonus for 1 gaming session For the duration of one gaming session (multiple gaming sessions in one day count as one gaming session), the player is granted a +1 luck bonus to all rolls (not checks though).
Share the wealth * Character Benefit to another Player's character The player spends his own Player Point to grant the character of another player one of the above Character Benefits.
DM Reroll 2 DM Rerolls 1 dice roll With DM's permission, may have the DM reroll any one roll
Character Specific Modifiers
Attribute Increase * +1 to attribute The cost is either equal to the new attribute score -5, or 5 Player Points, whichever is more. You must increase by 1 point each time

During an adventure characters gain experience points. These reflect the character’s development. Characters are also awarded experience points for accomplishments throughout an ongoing storyline. But what happens if the character dies? The player keeps nothing. All his hard work, time and commitment go for naught. That is why there are Player Points.
Unlike Experience Points, Player Points go to the player. Player points don’t gather by the hundreds or thousands, like experience points, and they aren’t awarded for defeating monsters or overcoming obstacles, nor are they used to grant a character more skills or feats or levels. What then are Player Points for? They are for the Player, a reward for exceptional role-playing, for committing a great deal of time to a story line, for being involved in major events in a campaign, or coming up with a great new idea, or in some other way providing enrichment to the role-playing experience that is above and beyond the norm. They are rewarded one at a time, are precious to the player, and can be used by that player at anytime for any character in the campaign world.
What can Player Points be spent on? Player Points are most commonly used to intercede on a character’s behalf. By spending a Player Point, a Player may give his characters a second chance in dire circumstances or a push of luck at the most needed time. They may also be used on behalf of the Player.

Character Benefits
The following benefits may be granted with the expenditure of Player Points to grant the player’s character a bonus:

Attribute reroll (1): During character creation, a player may spend one player point to allow a reroll for one of the character’s attributes. The player rolls that attribute again and keeps the better of the two rolls (this is the base roll, not adjusted by other attribute modifiers). This may only be taken once for a specific character.

2nd Attribute reroll (2): For the cost of two player points a player who has already purchased the above “Attribute reroll” for a character during character creation may purchase a 2nd Attribute reroll. This may not be applied to the same attribute, but rather provides the same benefit as “Attribute reroll” but to a different attribute.

Reroll (1): A player may, for the cost of one player point, grant his character a reroll for any one roll. This is decided after the initial roll is made. The player then announces that s/he wishes to attempt a “Reroll”, and makes the roll, choosing the better of the two rolls. The player may announce after the second roll that s/he wants one more try. A maximum of three rolls may be made, hence only two rerolls are allowed for any individual roll. In a case where a player chose to take 10 the DM may, at his own discretion, tell the player if it wasn’t good enough for the character to succeed without telling him/her any negative effects. In which case, the player may then opt to take a “Reroll”. This re-roll should be made before other ‘resultant’ re-rolls are made. It can not be retroactive to any thing but the last dice roll made.

Hitdie Reroll (1): When rolling Hitdie for hitpoints attained from gaining a level, a player may spend one luck point for a reroll. This is decided after the initial roll is made. The player hten announces that s/he wishes to attempt a “Hitdie Reroll”, and makes the roll, choosing the better of the two rolls. If the “Hitdie Reroll” was at least two points higher than the initial roll, then the player may not attempt another “Hitdie Reroll”. However, if it wasn’t then the player may continue to attempt “Hitdie Rerolls” until s/he gets one roll at least 2 points higher than the initial roll.

Take 10 after the fact (1): A player may, after making a roll, by spending one Player Point, choose to take 10 instead. This is only allowable for rolls/checks that normally allow a take 10.

Take 20 after the fact (2): A player may, after making a roll, by spending one Player Point, choose to take 20 instead. This is only allowable for rolls/checks that normally allow a take 20.

Improved Take 10 (1): A player may, before making a roll, by spending one Player Point, choose to allow his character to take 10 on a roll/check that would normally not allow a take 10. If the player has already rolled for the character it is too late.

Improved Take 20 (2): A player may, before making a roll, by spending one Player Point, choose to allow his character to take 20 on a roll/check that would normally not allow a take 20. If the player has already rolled for the character it is too late.

Luck Bonus (1): A player may spend one Player Point to grant his character a +4 luck bonus to all rolls/checks made during 1 full round (from initiative to initiative, or for 6 seconds of in-game time). A player may not give this to a character more than once in a round. However, the character may receive it from multiple players during the same round and it stacks, just not more than once from any one player (see Sharing the Wealth, below).

Lucky Day (1): T he player may spend a player point to give his character a “Lucky Day”. For the next 24 hours of in-game time, the character gets a +1 luck bonus to all rolls/checks. This does not apply to rolls the player makes that do not require an action on behalf of the character. For example, the luck bonus doesn’t apply to hit dice rolls, damage rolls for effects that are not the results of actions directly created by the character (ie the character fires a lightning bolt, inadvertently causing a landslide. If that was not the intention of the character, the rockslide doesn’t get the luck bonus on damage rolls). It is at the DM’s discretion to determine when the character gets the luck bonus.

Player Benefits
The following benefits may be granted to a player when that player spends a Player Point on him/herself.

Lucky Night (2): By spending two Player Points the player is granted a +1 luck bonus on any and all rolls made by that player for that gaming session. This cannot be taken more than once in a gaming session. If the player participates in the same campaign more than once in the same day, it is considered the same session. The “Lucky Night” bonus cannot be applied to character creation, but it can benefit hit die rolls. This benefit does not apply for checks (where dice are not rolled), such as when you take 10 or 20. In those cases the player’s luck doesn’t apply. Like all luck bonuses, the bonus from “Lucky Night” can stack, but only for the character, not the player.

Share the Wealth (*): At the DM’s discretion a Player may choose to spend his own Player Points towards another player’s character, giving that character one of the above Character Benefits. All limitations apply, hence if the character has received two rerolls already s/he cannot receive another. This Player Benefit it is always at the DM’s discretion, as the DM often knows something the other players do not. Any player may turn down this offer from another player, and thus the other player doesn’t spend the point, but that must be decided before the benefit is applied.

DM Reroll (2): The DM may, sometimes, allow the players to spend Player Points to force the DM to reroll. The DM should tell the Players when this is allowable and it should be the exception to the rule.. Though the Players may ask, they should expect that many times the DM may decide it is not acceptable. If the DM approves it, the Player may, by spending two Player Points have the DM re-roll. This re-roll should be made before other ‘resultant’ re-rolls are made. It can not be retroactive to any thing but the last dice roll made.

Awarding Player Points
Players are awarded Player Points for many different things. In most cases they are a reward from the DM for completing an ongoing story line, contributing to the campaign world, or showing exceptional roleplaying. However, it is also the responsibility of the other players in a campaign to determine who should get a Player Point for roleplaying.
The DM must be careful not to overaward Player Points, else s/he will find that every gaming session will be measured by how many Player Points the players can spend. The DM can lose control of events this way and then the story line, which is supposed to be fostered by Player Points, will collapse under the influence the players will have over events.
The award of Player Points can be measured by each gaming session, not by how often sessions occur. If gaming sessions are held once a week, then a player could possibly receive four or more player points a month, but then they also four sessions in which they may have a need to spend a player point. Hence, when awarding Player Points, consider how many a player receives in each gaming session. A good rule to go by is that each player should not receive more than two Player Points during a single gaming session. Therefore, you can determine if you game once a week, eight Player Points a month for each player is a good limit and probably excessive.
The following describes the different ways a player may gain a Player Point:

Roleplaying, by vote of peers: At the end of every gaming session, the DM should ask the other players to vote by secret ballot as to who roleplayed best that night. A player may vote for him/herself or choose not to vote at all. A player may not vote for more than one person. In such a case as the DM receives a ballot with more than one person listed on it, the first person on that list should be counted only. The DM tallies the votes. The player with the most votes is announced and given a single Player Point as reward. In the case of a tie between two of the players the DM may, if there are at least four players voting, grant both players a Player Point. However, if there is a tie between three or more players, then no one gets a Player Point. In those cases it is assumed that no one player roleplayed better than all the rest and therefore shouldn’t get a benefit more than anyone else.

Roleplaying, by vote of DM: After every gaming session, the DM should consider the roleplaying of all the players. The DM should award one player one Player Point for roleplaying in that session. No player should receive more than one Player Point for roleplaying during a particular gaming session. Hence if a player was voted for by the other players and given a Player Point for it, then the DM should find someone else to give a Player Point to that night. The DM may also decide that more than one person deserves such an award, but that should be very rare. Of course, the DM may also decide that no one should receive a roleplaying award for that gaming session.
The DM gives roleplaying awards because the DM often knows secrets about the characters that other players do not know. If the player has his character act stupid the other players might get mad and not vote for the player, but the DM knows the player’s character is wearing a hat of stupidity. Roleplaying such a change in character without revealing it to the other players, and suffering the harassment of the other players, should be rewarded.
The DM also has a better judgment of how well each player’s roleplaying skills have improved. If a player, who normally sits quietly and just rolls dice, suddenly has perked up and decided to get into character he should be rewarded for that.
When the DM has decided who will receive the roleplaying award, he should try to tell the recipient without letting the other players know. This helps keep secrets about the characters that shouldn’t be revealed yet. However, if the DM feels a player deserves the praise in front of everyone, then the DM should feel free to let everyone know.

Contribution to the Campaign: Players who provide contributions to the campaign should be recognized for his/her efforts. A player who draws PC portraits for the other players, writes short stories about the events of an adventure, writes songs about the heroes of the realm, or provides any other such creative work for the benefit of all those who play in the campaign, should be rewarded.
The DM must be careful when making awards from this category. Some people are very prolific in creative contributions. A player should be rewarded based on what is expected of him/her. If a player never contributes and then one day his character recites a poem the player wrote about their latest exploits, the DM should reward that player a Player Point. If a player spends the time between sessions drawing pictures of characters, npcs and events, then the DM should award that player for the initial drawings and then grant another one when something really exceptional is provided.
This bonus Player Point is supposed to be a means to encourage creativity, not to encourage the players to waste every minute of their life working on material for the campaign world. Also, the DM should not reward players who try to insert their own ideas of how the campaign should be run through the contributions they make. If a player draws a picture of what they think an arch-villain looks like, without discussing it with the DM, and the picture looks nothing like the arch-villain, then the player really hasn’t contributed anything. Always be thankful, but be very sparing with rewards.
As a good rule of thumb, a player shouldn’t receive more than one Player Point for Contributions to the Campaign each month.

Completing a Storyline: Participating in a storyline is a reward for the player, but seeing it through to completion is a benefit to the campaign. The story comes to an end, and the story can now be recorded into history. The DM knows what happened and can refer back to it throughout later events. Any player who completes a storyline for which they also participated in the beginning of should be awarded a Player Point. If the DM feels a player has been around for a great majority of the storyline and participates in its completion then the DM should award that player a Player Point. Also, if a player was there for almost the entire storyline but couldn’t be there for the completion, either for personal reasons or maybe because his character is dead, then the DM should feel free to award that player a Player Point.
A storyline should be at least four gaming sessions, or ‘chapters’. If a storyline is exceptionally long, the DM should divide the story up into ‘books’ and grant “Completing the Storyline” awards for each ‘book’ completed. In this case, each ‘book’ should consist of at least four ‘chapters’, and a storyline should consist of at least three ‘books’. Another way to look at it is that a ‘short story’ is about four ‘chapters’, and a ‘novel’ is about twelve ‘chapters’, which are broken up into three ‘books’. Completing a ‘novel’ should be worth about two Player Points.
The DM may want to also grant an exceptional award for players who complete an on-going storyline that is exceptionally long. Such a storyline might be called a ‘trilogy’ or maybe even a ‘cycle’. If you think of it that way, a ‘trilogy’ would consist of three ‘novels’, or thirty-six separate ‘chapters’. Storylines this long often do not happen consecutively. They may occur over years of play, with different players and characters, all eventually leading to converging plot that comes to a head with a grand finale. Players involved in such grand finales should be awarded based on their involvement in the ongoing storyline to this point. A player who was there for the beginning, participated in much of the storyline, and was there for the finale, could be awarded as many as three Player Points.
Be aware that awarding Player Points shouldn’t forgo awarding characters experience points for their participation in completing a storyline. After all, the character has had the experience.

Other means: The DM may award Player Points for other things at his own discretion. Having a good idea for a new rule variance, or buying something for the group to make the game run better (miniatures and maps for example), may be worthy of a Player Point. However, as always, you must be careful how many you award and be sure to be fair in the way you award Player Points.
Players must keep in mind that there is no easy formula for awarding Player Points. It is a trial and error method that the DM must experiment with before developing a final system he is comfortable with. Therefore players should understand when the DM changes his or her mind about granting when and how often Player Points are awarded.

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